« Going Back to My Fraternity Days -- Sort Of | Main | Tasting Table -- Ending 08.15.05 »

August 15, 2005

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341d0dbb53ef00d83438704153ef

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference This WBW #12 Roundup Delay is Brought to You By...:

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Is there anyone out there who can offer a miracle tip?? I am going crazy!!!

Thanks!
Nena (aka Mrs. Lenndevours)

Welcome to puppy parenthood! We have gone through this in the last 4 years with two of our three Standard Poodles. They learnt fairly quickly. First its best not to scold the puppy if he has an "accident" because you want him to go without fear of getting into trouble. Then you have to spend the time to take him outside (especially in the morning before he is active and before he goes to bed at night) and give him a command (we use "go to the toilet) and then reward him AFTER he goes, don't disturb him while he is going. You should also take him outside after he eats as this is one of the worst times for an "accident". Its not going to happen overnight. Our newest dog took a number of weeks before she got it. You also want to clean up really well after an "accident" because if any smell remains he may return there. Good luck!

First off, great name for the dog. :)

I'm the owner of two dogs, my beloved mutt and a hyperactive Chocolate Labrador. Saw both of them through puppyhood. Mike had the right idea--you're just going to have to deal with it for a while.

At ten months, he should be able to walk for quite a bit. Get used to regular long walks at certain times, during which he'll do all sorts of business all over the neighborhood. (Great exercise for all concerned.) I found it was helpful with mine just to keep them outside exercising and walking until they did something before bringing them back in.

Beagles have good noses. Don't hesitate to start training him on determining the difference between the various grapes--start easy with things like whites and Grenache, and as he grows older move through all the noble grapes and eventually up to the difficult Italian grapes.

(Just kidding, dogs don't need to drink wine, but there's no reason why a dog with a good nose couldn't be trained on scents in the same manner as a drug dog...)

The comments to this entry are closed.

Long Island Restaurant Week

The Cork Reports are protected under a...

  • Creative Commons License

Empire State Cellars


A Taste of Summer


Experience Finger Lakes

NYCR Advertisers




Become a NYCR Sponsor