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June 30, 2006

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My first taste of these two brews left me flat and I posted on Catch & Release how unremarkable I thought they were. However, after drinking a bit more under different circumstances my tune has changed and Porkslap is rapidly becoming one of my favs. Heinnieweisse is not far behind either.

The problem is I can’t smell the morning coffee anymore. Yeah, it sucks getting old and at the tender age of 47 my gustative and olfactory systems are just not what they used to be. So if I want to smell or taste something accurately, I have to do it not after a long day of inhaling who-knows-what, but after a nice hot shower.

That’s how I tasted Porkslap and Heinnieweisse the second time. And what a difference it made. I could actually smell and taste the stuff, and I liked it. Karilyn and I finished two six-packs in no time and we’re looking forward to buying more.

I noticed two things: the Porkslap tasted better as it warmed up (not unusual) and the low carbonation was a welcome surprise. I usually give bottled beer a good hard pour to break the carbonation a little. That’s not needed here.

I’m growing fonder of Hefe the more I drink. Not just the Heinnie, but I’ve been sampling others too. Good stuff. A far cry from what I was getting on tap at my local (recently defunct) pub.

I love the cans. Cans means I can bring these on my sailboat (no glass allowed for safety) and enjoy them in my favorite anchorage. It’s gonna be a good summer…

Just tried the Porkslap for the first time. Liked it quite a bit. Not a real strong ale. It reminded my taste buds of Murphy's Irish Stout. I would definitely buy it again. Paid $5.99 for a sixer where I live in NJ.

I agree that everyone must try their beers and go for a visit. i love microbreweries and the people that run butternuts are all about the beer.


Brew low cost beer. The amount of time you spend on brewing beer makes the small difference in cost between "just OK"

ingredients and top quality ingredients a minor point. Either way, the cost of brewing a 5 gallon batch is much cheaper

than buying a couple of cases of beer in the store.

Beer is made of cheap ingredients, so it doesn't hurt to buy the best. Surprisingly, the cheapest way to brew beer gives

you the best results: all grain brewing is the cheapest way to brew when grain is bought in bulk.

You do need a grain mill and a mash tun, so there is a small investment in equipment needed. But you should be able to

brew excellent quality beer for less than $2 per gallon, and you could brew a mild ale for as little as $1 per gallon, or

less than 10 cents per bottle (one gallon is about 10-1/2 12oz bottles). Most of my pilsners are about $1.50 a gallon

brews.

Other ways to reduce the cost of your beer are by growing your own hops and reusing yeast from the fermenter. Easy to do,

and it means that I don't have to buy yeast more than once every half year or so. The hops should last e through most of

the winter brews. So all you need is grain, which is about $0.70 per pound in a bulk purchase (much of the cost is in

shipping).

Beer Brewing Equipment Basic, simple, cheap equipment that gets the job done. Sometimes it adds to the challenge. But

through the mystique of brewing and remember that illiterate alewives brewed for centuries using tried and true recipes

and procedures before the dawn of kegerators, ph meters or hydrometers.

Beer Keg Brewing. After using bottles for years, you can jump to the corny keg (Cornelius keg). This is an important step

because it makes brewing so much easier. You can still bottle, but just a few bottles per batch, and use a corny keg to

fill the bottles. You can use corny kegs as secondary fermenting vessels. You can try out method where you leave the beer

in the primary for about two weeks until it clears nicely, and then upi carefully siphon it over to a corny, avoiding

transferring any trub.

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