« "With water comes life. All kinds of life." | Main | Heart & Hands Wine Company: Unique Focus (Pinot!) and a Unique Tasting Experience »

July 09, 2009

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341d0dbb53ef011570f4aa64970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Video: Why Limestone Helps Make Great Pinot:

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Great interview Evan!

Tom,
That's a good looking slope. You mentioned 3 different soil types, if you don't mind indulging the soil geek in me, what types are they?

What kind of vine/row spacing are you planning?

Lastly do the other vignerons in the FL think you're crazy for planting so much pinot, lol? Seems like many winemakers would grow it if they just didn't have to worry about selling and profiting from it.

Bryan -

Thanks for your inquiry.

"You mentioned 3 different soil types, if you don't mind indulging the soil geek in me, what types are they?"
Soil Types:
Base (pre-parking lot) - CeB - Cazenovia silt loam - Appear to be the best draining of the bunch. This is much sandier than other Cazenovia soils I've worked with. Test pits show at least 5ft before the hard pan. Chunks of limestone appear to be mixed throughout.
Middle (1st Terrace) - OrC - Ontario silt loam - Fairly well-drained medium textured soils derived mainly from limestone glacial till and the limestone bedrock. 20-40 inches before the hard pan. This layer seems to show the least amount of surface limestone of the three.
Top (top terrace) - CeC3 - Cazenovia silt loam - The difference on this versus the first mentioned is: 1. There is significantly more shale in this layer with a soft shale outcropping creating the second terrace, and 2. The hard pan appears to be 36-42 inches below the surface. Also, significantly more limestone is mixed in this layer than the first.

"What kind of vine/row spacing are you planning?"
We're looking at 8.5 ft row spacing and 3-4 ft between vines. Still working out some of the logistics on this, but we're shooting for 3ft with a single cane vsp on the Pinot and going to space it a little further on the Riesling.

"Lastly do the other vignerons in the FL think you're crazy for planting so much pinot, lol?" Yes, but I've always gone to the beat of my own drum, so I try not to listen to the critics. I believe that Pinot can be done (and done well) in this area. My take on the '07 Finger Lakes Pinot Noir tasting we did a couple of weeks ago is pretty promising for this region. We'll probably see in 3-5 years if we were right.

Thanks again for your questions. I look forward to many more.

Cheers,
Tom

The comments to this entry are closed.

Long Island Restaurant Week

The Cork Reports are protected under a...

  • Creative Commons License

Empire State Cellars


A Taste of Summer


Experience Finger Lakes

NYCR Advertisers




Become a NYCR Sponsor