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November 13, 2009

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What an outstanding post. In particular I dig the stuff about seeking out certain producers in challenging vintages. Those are some of the real treasures in the wine world.

Lots of wineries will make good wines in years like 2007.

It's the best producers, the ones who know and employ their crafts best -- in the vineyard and in the cellar -- that make the best wines year in and year out. There's no doubt about that.

And I look forward to trying some of these wines that Julia had a hand in making this year.

Friggin greenhorns, lol

Bryan, I'm so happy that this is your -what is it... THIRD harvest? I need to check with my Bryan Diary and double-check with everyone else you've worked with in Niagara and confirm, but I think that's what you said. I'm humbled to be in the presence of such experience. And especially envious of your well-suited-to-bottling footwear.

Kudos, an excellent post. Along with you, I'm getting my first harvest experience this year and so much of it echoes true (though I wasn't wearing high heels when punching down). At this point in time, I can't imagine there is any better way to appreciate the work of the people in the vineyards and the wineries than by joining them at harvest. -Cheers!

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