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December 02, 2009

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Matt -

You say, "We decided to bottle this wine unfined and unfiltered and it has pushed it into a direction that I would like to see all of our wines go, more terroir driven. As our vineyards mature and as we get more vines in the ground, I hope to grow more wines that reflect not only who we are, but where we are from as well."

Can you explain why fining and filtering takes away from a wine's sense of place? Don't read that question as being accusatory - or anything else besides curious. It's a very interesting statement.

Cheers - nice answers. Look forward to visiting you down in HV in 2010.

Evan,
We fine and filter wine in order to remove certain aspects or characteristic.(Keep in mind I’m talking about dry wines, mostly dry red wines here.) Perhaps harsh tannins are a problem or the chemistry leaves the wine unstable. Hopefully, if done properly, we remove only the off characteristics or qualities and leave the good ones. That being said, we are taking away from the wines natural state. That wine has now been altered, and that’s a good thing. Why would we have fined of filtered in the first place if we didn’t want to alter the wine. We want to produce wines that are consistent and enjoyable, not just natural. That is why 90% of our wines are filtered. I believe that filtering or fining a wine can make the wine better. However, if we can start producing more wines that do not need adjustment (fining or filtering), the wines will have more of a sense of place. They will tell the whole story not just a paraphrased version that highlights the good parts. Its that paraphrasing that takes away from a wines sense of place.
I hope that answers your question in one way, shape or form. Feel free to prod into it more. It might help me explain in a bit better. Hope to see you in the tasting room soon.

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