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April 12, 2010

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Benmarl's Baco noir should be breaking but haven't heard yet.

I should have pictures from Benmarl later today, Matt emailed me over the weekend that they had break on the Baco.

This is technically bud swell as no green leafy tissue is exposed. The woolly hairs from the bud scales will offer some protection against frost and water loss. In the instance of light frost these buds should still be fine.

Richard - thanks for the clarification - I think I was misjudging this a little as well. Whether I've officially got break or swell, there's no doubt we're progressing quickly. Here's my post and a photo where there is some "unfurling" but I guess still no official swell.

http://grandcruclasses.com/vineviews/2010/04/11/bud-break-comes-early/

Either way, I am hoping for a VERY WARM APRIL!

Cheers,
Jared

Jared - those look right on the edge but at least you don't seem to have very many of them out that far.
For me, I'm hoping for a very cold end of April! But there's a good possibility we're out of the woods.
Luckily grapevines have an entire set of secondary and if all else fails, tertiary (albeit sterile) "backup" buds.

Generally, early or late bud break has little to do with the date of harvest - its really the weather that occurs after May 15th that truly dictates the timing and quality of the harvest.

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