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September 10, 2010

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Most cans have BPA in them. So no thanks.

I have BPA issues with cans as well. I'm with ya, no thanks!

My understanding with the Bisphenol-A (BPA) scare is that the main concern is for infants drinking from baby bottles that may allow BPA to leach into the milk.

For adults, you'd have to ingest quite a bit of BPA to be at increased risk for health problems, according to www.bisphenol-A.org:

"Based on the results of the SPI study, the estimated dietary intake of BPA from can coatings is less than 0.00011 milligrams per kilogram body weight per day. This level is more than 450 times lower than the maximum acceptable or “reference” dose for BPA of 0.05 milligrams per kilogram body weight per day established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Stated another way, an average adult consumer would have to ingest more than 230 kilograms (or about 500 pounds) of canned food and beverages every day for an entire lifetime to exceed the safe level of BPA set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency."

Of course, studies about BPA not being dangerous could be funded by companies that use aluminum cans. It could all be a huge conspiracy. But what's known is that BPA has been in our food and beverage products for over 40 years, and there seem to be a lot of other things killing us faster these days.

If you're concerned about BPA, sure, don't drink or eat food from cans. But the validity of the media scare turned out to be so controversial that I didn't feel the need to put a warning note on this article; some would argue that beer itself will kill you, and I didn't want to get into that discussion.

From what I've read, I would definitely not recommend giving small children canned beer, mainly because you'll be arrested but also because of BPA. I did shoot emails to a few can-using brewers to get their two cents on this issue; stay tuned. Tom, if you know anything about BPA health studies, your input is always appreciated. Knowing that you're a fan of Genny Bock, however, I'm guessing you're as unalarmed as I am.

Julia,

Another great article. Nice read. One of my favorite things about craft beer embracing cans is the versatility. I can now drink good beer in places that glass bottles are not allowed like beaches and golf courses (some). Was able to enjoy some Pork Slap at the Saratoga Race Track this summer.

akatsuki and Bill,

The small amount of BPA is not alarming to me, but if you want to stay away, that is your choice. I only hope though that you make those choices across the board. If you eat anything from McDonald's your are probably putting more harmful stuff in your body than any small amount of BPA from a can.

Kevin

P.S. Am I the only one who's first though when hearing "BPA" was Ommegang's beer?

Kevin - thanks! The portability aspect of canned beer is a huge benefit, especially if you're camping, backpacking, or kayaking, all enterprises made much more fun with beer.

And I totally thought of Ommegang too :)

Validity of the media scare turned out to be so controversial that I didn't feel the need to put a warning note on this article; some would argue that beer itself will kill you, and I didn't want to get into that discussion.

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