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April 09, 2012

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Thanks for the recap, Rochelle. I agree that Standing Stone is doing some neat stuff!

I really do wish they would bag the plastic corks. Their wines can and do age, but in recent years I've had them turn terribly oxidized before their time. Most recent victim: '09 Vidal Ice. Go back to proper corks or screwcaps, please!

Cyclist, I'm with you. The Stelvin closure is much better than the plastic corks. And, as for real corks, a friend characterized the risk of cork taint as a risk/reward, and I agree. However, using a Stelvin on the "pop and drinks" to supplement is a better solution.

Currently in the finger lakes there are few producers with the ability to use stelvin closures. The equipment for stelvins would cost producers several thousand to tens of thousands of dollars. In the past two years several local wineries have been upgrading bottling lines with the option of stelvins. The stelvin seems like an ideal closure for our aromatic whites. Recently I tasted a finger lakes Riesling bottled under a stelvin and a cork. For me the stelvin won out the wine seemed to maintain the zippynes I associate with flx Riesling under stelvin. The same bottling under cork was still a nice wine but not as good as the stelvin in my opinion. But, stelvin can have negative qualities as well primarily increase in possible reductive aromas. Also the stelvins can kind of trap tdn the chemical that produces petrol notes in Riesling. This can showin petrol earlier in rieslings. The standing stone gewürztraminers are great and I would think could only improve with stelvins,corks or diams.

Kris,

I've heard the economic argument against screwcaps for years from the FL producers. Yet I buy many inexpensive small production wines from the back roads of France, Italy or Germany and, for some strange reason, the producers there can afford the equipment. Maybe some sort of bottling co-op with a mobile line is needed?

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